The Relationship Between Heat and Temperature

Heat in physics is defined as energy in transit. It is symbolized with the alphabet Q. (Strong, Martin C. The Great Alternative and Indie Discography of Heat) It is mostly connected with different movements of atoms, molecules and other particles. These particles either consist of particles that are either hot or cold. High temperature bodies, are often caused due to the high heat transfer, which is created by chemical reactions, nuclear reactions, electromagnetic dissipation, or mechanical dissipation.

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Heat is generally transferred between two different objects by radiation, conduction and convection. Heat is only passed on between objects, with the help of different temperatures. (“This Heat” in The Rough Guide to Rock (3rd ed. ) edited by Peter Buckley, Rough Guides Ltd. , 2003 (pgs. 1076-77). It generally flows amid areas that are not similar in thermal symmetry with each other; it instinctively flows from high temperature areas to low temperature areas. Temperature is one of those aspects of the everyday world that seems rather abstract when viewed from the standpoint of physics.

Thermometers measure temperature by a number of means, including the expansion that takes place in a medium such as mercury or alcohol. ( International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, Volume 47, Issues 6-7, March 2004, Pages 1141-1158J. M. Nobrega, F. T. Pinho, P. J. Oliveira and O. S. Carneiro. ) These measuring devices are gauged in several different ways, with scales based on the freezing and boiling points of water—as well as, in the case of the absolute temperature scale, the point at which all molecular motion virtually ceases. Temperature is a measure of the average heat or thermal energy of the particles in a substance. Energy Conversion 2 and Management, Volume 46, Issues 18-19, November 2005, Pages 3091-3102) Since it is an average measurement, it does not depend on the number of particles in an object. In that sense it does not depend on the size of it. For example, the temperature of a small cup of boiling water is the same as the temperature of a large pot of boiling water. Even if the large pot is much bigger than the cup and has millions and millions more water molecules. We experience temperature every day.

When it is very hot outside or when we have a fever we feel hot and when it is snowing outside we feel cold. When we are boiling water, we wait for the water temperature to increase and when we make popsicles we wait for the liquid to become very cold and freeze. There is only one underlying source of heat, and that is the Earth’s internal heat. However, it is delivered to the target rocks in various ways in different styles of Metamorphism. However, it is delivered to the target rocks in various ways in different styles of Metamorphism. We know that the Earth is hot inside and cool outside.

The simplest way, perhaps, to heat rocks is to gradually bury them over geologic time and let heat slowly conduct in. Remember that the parent rock type and mineralogy is important in determining what minerals actually occur at equilibrium, and small changes in volatiles (usually water, also C02 and oxygen) have a big effect on reaction rates and stable mineralogy. If we bury rocks suddenly, in a subduction zone, there is not enough time for heat to conduct in. Now we get High P, low T metamorphism, such as Blueschists. (http: various sourcesofheat. com) Of course, we need equally rapid uplift to expose the rocks at surface again!

Heat seldom simply conducts in the dry state through the matrix of a rock. It is usually helped along by fluid movement. Often, fluid movement dominates totally. 3 The concept of heat differs from temperature, in my opinion, heat is the total energy of molecular motion in a substance while temperature is a measure of the average energy of molecular motion in a substance. Heat energy concisely depends on the speed of the particles, the number of particles (the size or mass), and the type of particles in an object. On the contrary, temperature does not depend on the size or type of object.

For example, the temperature of a small cup of water might be the same as the temperature of a large tub of water, but the tub of water has more heat because it has more water and thus more total thermal energy. Often the concepts of heat and temperature are thought to be the same, but they are not. Perhaps the reason the two are usually and incorrectly thought to be the same is because as human beings on Earth everyday experience leads us to notice that when you heat something up, say like putting a pot of water on the stove, then the temperature of that something goes up.

More heat, more temperature – they must be the same, right? Turns out, though, this is not true. Temperature is a number that is related to the average kinetic energy of the molecules of a substance. (http:temperaturevsheat. com) If temperature is measured in Kelvin degrees, then this number is directly proportional to the average kinetic energy of the molecules. (http:temperature. com) Heat is a measurement of the total energy in a substance. That total energy is made up of not only of the kinetic energies of the molecules of the substance, but total energy is also made up of the potential energies of the molecules. References Strong, Martin C. The Great Alternative and Indie Discography of Heat International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, Volume 47, Issues 6-7, March 2004, Pages 1141-1158J. M. Nobrega, F. T. Pinho, P. J. Oliveira and O. S. Carneiro. http:temperature. com http:temperaturevsheat. com http: various sourcesofheat. com “This Heat” in The Rough Guide to Rock (3rd ed. ) edited by Peter Buckley, Rough Guides Ltd. , 2003 (pgs. 1076-77. Energy Conversion and Management, Volume 46, Issues 18-19, November 2005, Pages 3091-3102.

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